Shallows, K. Hudspeth, 2016; Collagraph, Screenprint monotype, Pronto Plate lithography; Unique; 11.25" x 8.75".

Shallows, K. Hudspeth, 2016; Collagraph, Screenprint monotype, Pronto Plate lithography; Unique; 11.25″ x 8.75″.

It Was to Be a Glittering City

November 20, 2016 – January 8, 2017
Solo exhibition by Kathleen Hudspeth at Under the Bridge, North Miami, FL

12425 NE 13 AVE #4

It Was to Be a Glittering City, a solo exhibition by Kathleen Hudspeth, projects the future of Miami into a speculative eventual decline.

The imagery presents iconic vignettes spun from the narrative of an old woman’s history of place and family.  Graphic, deeply encoded images act as synecdoche for the landscape, the city, the people, their dreams, and the consequences of building those dreams.

A short fiction written by the artist accompanies the artwork, and was inspired in tone and theme by The Invention of Morel, by Argentinian author Adolfo Bioy Casares.  In Bioy Casares’ novella, the desire to capture that which cannot be possessed results in the creation of an enduring monument which itself is the means of destroying the object of desire.  The protagonist who serves as witness to these illusory events had no role in instigating them, yet lives within them, and becomes an eventual victim of desire as well.

Similarly, the audience viewing It Was to Be a Glittering City becomes protagonist, witness, and victim within the elusive remnants of consequence.

The works presented are unique, hand-pulled prints created using monotype, lithography, intaglio, collagraph, watercolor and gouache.

Kathleen Hudspeth is a native of Miami, Florida, and an adjunct professor of printmaking at New World School of the Arts in downtown Miami.  She is also founder and co-director of Turn-Based Press, the creation of which she was awarded a Knight Arts Challenge grant for in 2009.  She received an MFA in printmaking from the University of Miami in 2009, and a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin in 2000.

In October, I’ll be opening a solo show of work at Under the Bridge, an art space in North Miami run by Lou Anne Colodny.

I’m very excited about the exhibition, and I’m in the process of making the work.

The basis for the work that will be in the show started with a couple of previous images, My Miami, an editioned screenprint that I made in 2012, and a sketchbook plan for an edition which I drew in 2015 (but have not yet made).

My Miami, 2012; Screenprint, Edition of 15, 15" x 11"

K Hudspeth Building a Wall 2015 sketchbook drawing

The text in My Miami reads:

“Trudging through sawgrass towards the glittering city of condos as people in nice cars speed by on the elevated roadway.”

The text in the sketchbook drawing reads:

“Fuck you. I’m building a wall.”

I promise that I came up with my wall comment well-before Trump began to blather about his beautiful wall–9 months before he did, in fact (I just checked).  That text, in fact, is so unrelated to Trump’s wall that I can’t use it in any form for the work I’m currently making. It might survive the association on its own, as a standalone edition, but really, my wall comment is about development in Miami; I had also planned a companion edition, in which the cinderblock is rotated vertically, and would be accompanied by this text:

“Fuck you. I’m building a mall.”

In any case, the two narratives have been simmering in my mind for quite a while now, and one of the first images that I can call ‘done’ for my upcoming show clearly shows a visual blend of the two.

Shallows, K. Hudspeth, 2016; Collagraph, Screenprint monotype, Pronto Plate lithography; Unique; 11.25" x 8.75".

Shallows, K. Hudspeth, 2016; collagraph, screenprint monotype, Pronto Plate lithography; unique; 11.25″ x 8.75″.

The figure of the woman in My Miami also remains part of the in-progress body of work, though not as a literal form.  She becomes the voice of the show–in a way; I’ve written a short fiction that is related to the exhibition, and she (or a version of her) is the narrator.

The short fiction is something that I wrote which is inspired in tone, and somewhat in theme, by The Invention of Morel, by Adolfo Bioy Casares–it’s one of my favorite stories (it’s a novella of 90 pages), and I’ve been ruining (too much love, not enough preservation) a gorgeous, 1964 University of Texas Press copy of it ever since I bought it from a used bookstore in Denton, Texas, sometime in the ’90s.  This edition includes a cover and illustrations by Norah Borges de Torre, the younger sister of Jorge Luis Borges; she’s pretty interesting, and happened to be a member of the Florida group, which I can’t help but think is an amusing relationship given my location.

Norah Borges de Torre The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares

Borges de Torre’s illustrations appear to be woodcuts, and their style is a delightful tropical modernism.  You can see some of the interior illustrations here (not my flickr account).

The Invention of Morel is such a resonant narrative for me that I want everyone to read it, but I’m also completely wary of spoiling it in any way.  I’ve described it roughly, and somewhat badly in my initial press-release/statement text (which will be at the bottom of this post), but a simpler thing to do might be to share this quote that my eye just caught upon as I was looking through the book before scanning the cover above:

“We will be able to live a life that is always new, because in each moment of the projection we shall have no memories other than those we had in the corresponding moment of the eternal record, and because the future, left behind many times, will maintain its attributes forever.”

The bit I shared above is but a fragment of an astounding revelation made by a man (Morel, in fact) who has ultimately, because he cannot let go of the vision he has for his desires, betrayed his friends, the moment for which he feels so deeply, and their futures.

Like many narratives from South America that were written during eras tainted by oppressive political regimes, The Invention of Morel includes a witness figure.  This poor fellow washes up as an outsider, stumbling into what appears to be the glamorous and incongruous life of certain others.  It transpires that most of what he witnesses are relics of something that does not exist anymore.  The novella has two sets of actors, then, the people who are ‘living’ and the individual apparently witnessing their lives.  [Actually, there’s also a third actor–the character who writes the footnotes, and comments upon the observations of the witness.]  The setting is an unidentified island, which the witness-narrator describes as having large floods, and dangerously unpredictable high tides.

I don’t want to say too much that’s very specific right now about how related all of this is to the work I’m making, as specificity is an uncomfortable blow to an in-progress state of thought.  I could probably write endless amounts about Bioy Casares’ novella as it has generally inspired me and my work, but perhaps another day.

The other image for the upcoming show which I can safely call ‘done’ is below, followed by a statement and information for the same.

Saltless, K. Hudspeth, 2016; ink pencil; trace-drawing monotype; Pronto Plate lithograph, watercolor; Unique;11" x 9.75"

Saltless, K. Hudspeth, 2016; ink pencil; trace-drawing monotype; Pronto Plate lithograph, watercolor; Unique;11″ x 9.75″

 

It Was to Be a Glittering City

November 20, 2016 – January 8, 2017
Solo exhibition by Kathleen Hudspeth at Under the Bridge, North Miami, FL

12425 NE 13 AVE #4

It Was to Be a Glittering City, a solo exhibition by Kathleen Hudspeth, projects the future of Miami into a speculative eventual decline.

The imagery presents iconic vignettes spun from the narrative of an old woman’s history of place and family.  Graphic, deeply encoded images act as synecdoche for the landscape, the city, the people, their dreams, and the consequences of building those dreams.

A short fiction written by the artist accompanies the artwork, and was inspired in tone and theme by The Invention of Morel, by Argentinian author Adolfo Bioy Casares.  In Bioy Casares’ novella, the desire to capture that which cannot be possessed results in the creation of an enduring monument which itself is the means of destroying the object of desire.  The protagonist who serves as witness to these illusory events had no role in instigating them, yet lives within them, and becomes an eventual victim of desire as well.

Similarly, the audience viewing It Was to Be a Glittering City becomes protagonist, witness, and victim within the elusive remnants of consequence.

The works presented are unique, hand-pulled prints created using monotype, lithography, intaglio, screenprinting, collagraph, watercolor and gouache.

Kathleen Hudspeth is a native of Miami, Florida, and an adjunct professor of printmaking at New World School of the Arts in downtown Miami.  She is also founder and co-director of Turn-Based Press, the creation of which she was awarded a Knight Arts Challenge grant for in 2009.  She received an MFA in printmaking from the University of Miami in 2009, and a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin in 2000.

Tiny Blossoms, 2008; Oil-Based Monotype and Graphite

Tiny Blossoms, 2008; Kathleen Hudspeth.  Oil-Based Monotype and Graphite.

I have work on view at the Laundromat Art Space as part of the South Florida survey exhibition 100+ Degrees in the Shade, curated by Jane Hart in collaboration with Chris Ingalls and Nina Arias.

About the exhibition:

This expansive show [includes] an array of works in all media, by a selection of some of the finest artists of South Florida. Sculpture and installation works, painting, photography, mixed media and works on paper, as well as video and performance are included. The breadth of this exhibit [is] both inclusive and discerning, with an emphasis on innovation, impact, and inspiration, in ways which are integral to the lush, tropical-urban environment that exemplifies South Florida. There [are] a total of over 150 participants, encompassing internationally and nationally known established, mid-career and emerging artists included. A 220 page full color, hardcover book will be released by [NAME] Publications in conjunction with the exhibition.

My work is a monotype with hand-drawn elements.  The color is probably truest in the image above, which was professionally documented, rather than in the installation shot from the opening, which is below.

Monotype with hand-drawn graphite element. Unique.

I was invited by Kristen Bartel, the printmaking professor at the University of Wisconsin at Parkside, to be a visiting artist on April 13 and 15, 2015.

K. Hudspeth at Univerisity of Wisconsin at Parkside

For my time with Kristen and her students, I chose to offer a chipboard relief/collagraph workshop, which we printed with a combination of intaglio and color viscosity inking strategies.

University of Wisconsin at Parkside Printmaking Workshop with vi

University of Wisconsin at Parkside Printmaking Workshop with vi

University of Wisconsin at Parkside Printmaking Workshop with vi

University of Wisconsin at Parkside Printmaking Workshop with vi

I made shaped plates for my demonstration prints; one is below.

Chipboard relief; intaglio inked with color viscosity inking. Printed on Zerkall Copperplate, 11" x 15", 2015.

The other plate wasn’t so great, but this one worked out well.  It even had the added bonus of not having an ‘up’ or ‘down’.

Chipboard relief; intaglio inked with color viscosity inking. Printed on Zerkall Copperplate, 11" x 15", 2015.

Kristen also went to the University of Texas at Austin (though well after I did), and learned color viscosity from Lee Chesney, which was entertaining for us to recount, though perhaps less so for the students.

Parkside is well-known for hosting the National Small Print Exhibition every year (I should have applied!), and the opening for it was going to be just a few days after my workshop.  Fortunately, the work was installed, and I got to see the exhibition.  I was happily surprised to see some screenprints by Lise Drost, a University of Miami professor of printmaking, and my mentor, who was the Chair of the Department of Art and Art History, as well as the head of my Thesis Committee, while I was pursuing my Masters there.

University of Wisconsin at Parkside National Small Print Exhibit

Because they’ve held this exhibition annually since 1987, and there are purchase awards associated with it, Parkside has prints on nearly all the interior walls of the campus.  Like, really.

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus interior, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus interior, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus interior, April 2015

It made me incredibly happy to see so many prints as part of a day-to-day college experience.  It’s rewarding to be in a place where an esteem for printmaking is evident.

Unsurprisingly, the Parkside printshop is very nice, and very well maintained!

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

University of Wisconsin at Parkside printshop

I had a lot of fun in the Wisconsin overall–mostly thanks to my brother, who is a philosophy professor at Parkside.  He took me cool places, like to the Mars Cheese Castle.

Mars Cheese Castle

Mars Cheese Castle's Castle

It was cool because I like cheese.

My brother took me to other cool places, too, like the headquarters of a personal care products corporation in Racine.

Johnson Wax Headquarters

Johnson Wax Headquarters

That was cool because I like personal care products.  Wait . . . no.  Architecture.  Because the architecture is cool.

Have you seen Wright’s Johnson building (the Research Tower) at night, by the way?

Johnson Wax Headquarters

If I were a certain type of person, I would be easily convinced that the Johnson Wax Headquarters was really an alien base.  All your base are belong to Johnson Wax!  That was a total non-sequiter.

Another cool place that my brother took me was to the Kenosha History Center.

Kenosha History Center dolls and toys

Kenosha History Center dolls and toys

Kenosha History Center Cars

Kenosha History Center Cars

Kenosha History Center Cars

Kenosha History Center

Kenosha History Center Annie Oakley on a Bike

The Kenosha History Center was cool because I am clearly a giant nerd.  Also: Annie Oakley riding a bicycle while taking aim.  Not just any bicycle, but a Sterling Bicycle.  Built like a watch!

That alone was worth the price of admission.  Well. That and the AMC AM VAN prototype.

Speaking of cool, Wisconsin in April is cold (nevermind that 60 degrees sign above–that was the warmest day I was there, and the natives were frolicking in the heat).  The landscape is so entirely different from Miami, too.

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus, April 2015

University of Wisconsin at Parkside campus, April 2015

And speaking of Miami, another cool place my brother took me was to Stevens Point, Wisconsin. [Wait for it!]  Stevens Point had a philosophy conference, which was fun, but it also has a sculpture park.  Look what I found in the sculpture park:

Tom Scicluna in the Stevnes Point Sculpture Park

Tom Scicluna in the Stevnes Point Sculpture Park

Work by a pal of mine from Miami.  Small, small, small, cool world.

 

This Spring season finds me behind on my planned activities–my grandmother passed away in early February after declining health concerns, and at the time of this post’s writing, it’s only been just over a month since then.  She helped to raise me and my brother, and I don’t feel as if I’ve yet had the proper time to grieve.  Work has had to continue, as has teaching.  Somehow, I’ve still been very active, even while other planned tasks have had to be delayed.

Turn-Based Press participated in the the MOA+D Bazaar Bar on February 21, for which I made and printed some upcycled, T-shirt Lubber Totes as well as a few Moleskine notebooks.

Lubber Tote by KH for Turn-Based Press

Also for Turn-Based Press, I printed a triptych edition for Adler Guerrier, on view in booth B15 for Marisa Newman Projects at Volta, March 5 – 8.

More plans are in the works: I’ll be heading up to the University of Wisconsin at Parkside to be a visiting printmaker towards the middle of April, and I have an edition series with four artists that I’m going to print for Turn-Based Press that I’ll be initiating in just a week or so, I hope!  Grief is unpredictable, of course, so I hope that everyone can be patient. <3

Volta opened in New York today, and in booth B15, Marisa Newman Projects, you’ll find an installation of work by Adler Guerrier (full disclosure: my husband!) which includes a triptych of prints.

Adler Guerrier at Volta NYC 2015, Marisa Newman ProjectsThis triptych edition of 50 can better be understood from the printmaker’s perspective as three separate editions of 50, each with two runs–or 300 runs total (if you only count the good impressions).

The base run is a polyester plate lithograph from a scanned solvent transfer, printed onto the plate from a laser printer.  Adler uses solvent transfers frequently, and some funky artifacts from the initial copies that were used to make the transfers are still visible in the prints, which have their own artifacts from the janky laser printer that Adler and I used to print the litho plates.  You can see the scanned solvent transfer images on his website, for comparison.  [On the to-do list, by the way, is purchase a new laser printer for TBP expressly for polyester plate workshop use.]

Adler’s body of work for the past couple of years has used a color palette inspired by local flora and architecture; he gave me color samples that I had to match.

The litho ink had to be mixed somewhat in advance of printing, as I knew I would need to add mag (magnesium carbonate) to the inks to lessen the chance of the image filling in or scumming during printing; I think the polyester plates are more sensitive to the texture of mag that hasn’t sufficiently been absorbed into the ink mass than stones or ball-grained plates are, so I prefer to let the inks sit at least a day before using them.

In any case, whether the inks are oil-based or acrylic (as for screenprinting), it takes some time to get the color right, as you can see below.  [The ink on black paper was for the Lubber Totes I printed for the MOA+D Bazaar Bar event, not for this project, though the rest of the tests were.]

Ink tests at Turn-Based Press

To keep myself from getting confused by the numerous draw-downs, I name the colors once I get it right.

Ink tests at Turn-Based Press

Ink for Guerrier triptych, Turn-Based Press, Whale Tail

Polyester plate litho is printed just like stone–conceptually, at least.  In practice, it can be more frustrating–things can go wrong that you don’t have as many at-press remedies for.  So care taken before the plate ever makes it to the press is crucial.  Plates can’t be touched, digital images either need to be half-toned or carefully adjusted for brightness and contrast, the plates need to be heat-set, inks need to be modified a bit differently, gum needs to be added to the water, and maybe a bit of mag as well.

Stones feel forgiving, generally, I think, but I have learned that polyester plate litho can be very predictable during printing; I even successfully closed a plate down with a gum-coat and printed with it again the following day with no image deterioration.  This shouldn’t be news to other lithographers out there–I mean, I myself had read that it could be predictable, and that they could be used again over multiple printing sessions, but until this edition, I suppose that I hadn’t had them completely figured out.

Rolling up a polyester litho plate at Turn-Based Press

I’m only able to print about four or five polyester plate impressions an hour, though; it’s part of the dance that balances the speed of the image rolling up against the chance that it will roll-up too quickly, and likely then fill-in.  If you do the math on 150 polyester plate impressions, you’ll soon realize that Adler has priced this triptych at a steal, and that I’m on my feet for eons during printing.  The latter explains my strong advocacy for anti-fatigue mats, which I set up in regional trails in the printshop according to my movements.

Printing the Guerrier triptych at Turn-Based Press

If I had a litho press at Turn-Based Press, I likely would have done the base run from a solvent transfer onto a stone (amusingly, I do have those!).  Since I have etching presses instead, it had to be some form of plate lithography, preferably without pin-registration (it feels too cumbersome for me on etching presses).

Printing a polyester plate for the Guerrier triptych at Turn-Bas

Adler made a gif of me registering paper to one of the plates on the pressbed. It’s epically gigantic. You can see it here.

After the litho run was sufficiently dry, a run of fine, screenprinted marks was done on top.  Adler developed the marks for the screenprinted run from the actual lithographs themselves, rather than from pre-planned imagery, in case of any possible mismatch between the work-as-executed and the planned images.  He drew the positives with ink on tracing paper, and they were directly exposed to the coated screens.

Adler Guerrier work-in-progress, triptych edition, screenprint p

I don’t think we took any images of the editions while screenprinting; it was so quick. Oh, well!  Here’s one of me cleaning up.

Screenprint clean-up at Turn-Based Press

It’s always satisfying to see a whole bunch of prints side by side.

Adler Guerrier work-in-progress, triptych edition, checking qual

However, it’s a completely different experience than seeing the triptych as a whole, framed, installed work.

Adler Guerrier at Volta NYC 2015, Marisa Newman Projects

Adler Guerrier at Volta NYC 2015, Marisa Newman Projects

If you’re up in NYC right now, go give them a personal look-see.

 

I had two works in at the Florida Gulf Coast University for Self Published, a show of artists books and editions that was curated by Juana Meneses and Leila A Leder Kremer.

Three framed prints and a large-scale pattern repeat screenprint were shown at the MDC-NWSA Faculty Show, Work/Work at the Museum of Art and Design.

KH at MDC Museum of Art and Design, WorkWork, 2014 edit 2

The image below shows the registration marks that I used to print the large-scale pattern repeat.

K. Hudspeth, registration marks for Stupid Lubbers (large scale

On November 22, 2014, as part of the Miami Book Fair‘s local focus The Swamp, poet Stephen Schaurer read poems from broadsides that he collaborated on with me and Ana G. Gonzalez Silva; Ana and I were co-presenters, showing the finished broadsides on stage while he spoke. The broadsides were on view in Sweat II  at the Miami-Dade College Kendall Campus gallery.

The broadside that Stephen and I collaborated on is titled Cuts, and is a two-run print using an intaglio-inked collograph plate and Pronto Plate lithography.

Cuts, by K. Hudspeth and Stephen Schaurer

 

 

 

September’s annual DWNTWN Art Days always has me in a frenzy; Turn-Based Press participates with demonstrations or workshops and a show, both of which are a lot of organizational work and physical labor.  This year, I’ll be leading a workshop with Tom Hart of the Sequential Artists Workshop in Gainesville, Florida titled Comic Art Workshop: Draw and Print!

SAW and TBP

All the prep time for Art Days happens right at the start of the semester as well, and there’s always a bit of adjustment at the start of classes in terms of the school’s printshop.  In addition to those expected eventualities, this year I’ve had several deadlines to meet for my own artwork–a happy complication, of course!

I’ll be participating in the MDC/NWSA faculty show at the Museum of Art and Design in downtown Miami.  The show is called Work/Work, and in addition to several framed prints, I’ve been working on a large-scale, repeat-pattern version of Stupid Lubbers which has been quite challenging.  Work/Work opens on the first night of DWNTWN Art Days, Friday, September 19th, from 6 – 9 PM.

K. Hudspeth, Stupid Lubbers (in progress), 2014; at Turn-Based P

K. Hudspeth, Stupid Lubbers (in progress), 2014; at Turn-Based P

I also created a print for the Sweat Broadsides with Stephen Schaurer, which is a combination of collography and pronto plate lithography.

Cuts (on the pressbed), by K. Hudspeth and Stephen Schaurer

The latest iteration of Sweat will be exhibited at the Miami-Dade College Kendall Campus starting September 25, with a reception on October 2nd.  Though it’s not part of the DWNTWN Art Days, the work delivery deadline was right in the thick of Art Days preparation, so it was as good as being part of it for me.

Stephen will do a reading of his poem during the Miami Book Fair on November 22nd. I’ll post again about that closer to the event.

 

I’m in a group show at the Juan Ruiz Gallery which opens on Thursday, July 24, 2014, from 6:30 to 9 PM.

Short Story Invite - Juan Ruiz Gallery

The show is titled Short Story, and was curated by Ruben Torres-Llorca. Participating artists are:

Esteban Blanco
Pip Brant
Carol K. Brown
Randy Burman
Liliam Dominguez
Kathleen Hudspeth
Mary Larsen
Rogelio Lopez Marin
Rafael Lopez-Ramos
Ruben Torres-Llorca
Lucy de la Vega

I’m exhibiting three screenprints, each of which was created as a personal commentary about the condition of being an artist in Miami, Florida.  They’re part of an ongoing body of work which is produced as the whim–or need–strikes me.

K. Hudspeth, Stupid Lubbers, 2014, 11" x 15" 5-run pattern repea

Stupid Lubbers, 2014.

Stupid Lubbers depicts the juvenile Eastern Lubber about a week after spawning as they swarm a hibiscus/monk’s cap which is more a plant I drew from memories than from actuality.  I grew up with the Lubber swarmings being a commonplace springtime occurrance, and I’ve re-stated the scene as a contemporary retelling of the Ant and the Grasshopper fable.  In Stupid Lubbers there are no longer any ants.

K. Hudspeth, Stupid Lubbers, 2014, 11" x 15" 5-run pattern repea

Stupid Lubbers is also created as a pattern-repeat image-when the entire edition is adjacent, the works become a (nearly) seamless pattern–their own swarm.

Magic City Snake Oil, K. Hudspeth, 2013

Magic City Snake Oil, K. Hudspeth, 2013

Magic City Snake Oil (for display only), is an arch comment on selling artwork versus showing artwork.  It also has some implied critique of the practice of editioning commercial products, in that I’ve put the edition number of the print on the bottle depicted itself.  Artificial production limitations–editions–are just commercial selling strategies to control ‘value’.

My Miami, 2012; Screenprint, Edition of 15, 15" x 11"

My Miami, 2012; Screenprint, Edition of 15, 15″ x 11″

My Miami depicts the artist trudging through sawgrass–have you tried that? It really hurts! They don’t call it sawgrass for nothing!–near a stark overpass.  The text reads:

Trudging through sawgrass towards the glittering city of condos as people in nice cars speed by on the elevated roadway.

The artworld is one that can be strange for an artist to exist within.  There are so many parties and galas–glamor and the visible trappings of wealth and capital everywhere, yet attempting to earn a living as an artist, and not from any other job, is something that keeps one under or close to the poverty line.  It can be disturbing, moving from one to the other, the way one has to, for work.  It’s a hell of a commute!

The world that artists live in, not visit, is the wet, cutting slog.  At least we can make jokes about it with our peers.

 

It’s end-of-semester again! Grades are due soon, I did my stint at juries, the class print exchange is coming up this week, and an event at Turn-Based Press at the end of the week has me making even more prints than usual.

I’ve been tearing down a ton of paper, trying to get Pronto Plates printed [Note to peeps: Kinko’s/FedEx no longer allows printing on “customer-supplied” paper–THANKS A LOT! Guess I need to look into a laser printer that can handle 11″ x 17″.], printing film positives for screenprinting [Note to peeps: HP inkjet printers that can handle 13″ x 19″ are the bee’s knees!], working on hand-drawn positives and printing, printing, printing.

Some images below.

K. Hudspeth, hand-drawn positives for Stupid Lubbers. In product

Right Way Up  (Pronto Plate edition) from The good Inn, by Black

The Good Inn edition